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Star trek: Deep Space Nine 7.12b - The dogs of war

Stardate around 52700
Threat advisory: High - High risk of entertaining activities

Episode propaganda

While Sisko (Avery Brooks) takes command of a new ship named in honour of the Defiant, Kira (Nana Visitor), Garak (Andrew J Robinson) and Damar (Casey Biggs) barely escape a Dominion ambush on Cardassia and are forced into hiding. Quark (Armin Shimerman) receives a static-filled message from Grand Nagus Zek (Wallace Shawn), the Ferengi leader, that he's being named Zek's successor. Now cured of the deadly Changeling Virus, Odo (René Auberjonois) is outraged to learn that he was infected by Section 31 - an unsanctioned extremist organisation within the Federation.

Persons of interest

  • Avery Brooks .... Commander Benjamin Lafayette Sisko, Director
  • René Auberjonois .... Constable Odo
  • Michael Dorn .... Lieutenant Worf
  • Nicole de Boer .... Lieutenant Ezri Dax
  • Cirroc Lofton .... Jake Sisko
  • Colm Meaney .... Chief O'Brien
  • Armin Shimerman .... Quark
  • Alexander Siddig .... Doctor Julian Bashir
  • Nana Visitor .... Colonel/Commander Kira Nerys
  • Majel Barrett .... Starfleet computer voice
  • Wallace Shawn .... Grand Nagus Zek
  • Andrew J Robinson .... Garak
  • Casey Biggs .... Damar
  • Penny Johnson .... Kasidy Sisko
  • Jeffery Combs .... Weyoun, Brunt
  • Max Grodénchik .... Rom
  • Barry Jenner .... Admiral Ross
  • Cecily Adams .... Ishka
  • JG Hertzler .... Martok
  • Chase Masterson .... Leeta
  • Aron Eisenberg .... Nog
  • Julianna McCarthy .... M'pella
  • Tiny Ron .... Maihar'du
  • Salome Jens .... Changeling
  • Peter Allen Fields .... Storywriter
  • René Echevarria .... Screenwriter
  • Ronald D Moore .... Screenwriter

Cinematic intelligence sources

Intelligence analyst

Special Agent Matti

Intelligence report

Fun on Ferenginar.

The dogs of war (yet another Shakespearean reference: "Let loose the dogs of war") is the penultimate Deep Space Nine episode. It is the calm before the storm. The two big decisions are strategic retreat by the Dominion (intended to confuse the Alpha Quadrant alliance) and strategic assault by the alliance (refusing the confusion of the Dominion). The rest of the episode wraps up the lives of the Ferengi.

The biggest ironies have always lain with these avaricious beings. While seemingly a joke to the serious-minded Federations they have always been able to maintain their sovereignty in an increasingly hostile galaxy. In fact, they have prospered where mightier empires have faltered and, in some cases, fallen. Their history, once pretty stable, began to change with the discovery of the wormhole back in Emissary. Quark rose to prominence as the Ferengi businessman closest to the action. That brought Zek to his door. It also brought Ishka onto the scene, both in Zek's life and in Quark's. Ishka began the change from pure patriarchal capitalism to liberal socialism and handed the baton to Rom ("A kinder, gentler Grand Nagus"). That makes Nog (his son and first Ferengi in Starfleet) even more important. The irony of Rom's and Nog's rise from bar usefuls to politico-military leaders is not lost on Quark, who has ended up back where he started: owner of a small bar and a small life.

Armin Shimerman's performance as Quark has been solid and tremendously subtle for the entire run of Deep Space Nine. While presenting the greedy, hedonistic side of the Ferengi he has also brought out the pains and sufferings of a mediocre man trying his hardest to overcome his inadequacies: a non-Federation citizen on a Federation station, a capitalist in the new world economy of the Federation, a criminal in the crimeless Federation, a neutral to the Cardassian Union, the Federation, the Bajorans, the Klingons, the Romulans and the Dominion. Odds are that he should've been wiped out long ago, but like any Little Aussie Battler he knows when to duck and cover. His whole existence has been a war against the vagaries of fate. He has been Grand Nagus, a bankrupt, an Ambassador, an annoyance, sucked up to and sucking up. Congrats to Armin on a job well done.

Jeffery's Brunt has always been an amazement to me: so completely different from Weyoun that it was only on comparing the names of the actors that he realised that they were one and the same. While the Ferengi has always been something of a cipher, a plot complicator, the Weyouns (all eight of them) have each been major players. It is the difference between each clone that has impressed me. The unctuousness of Weyoun 5 as compared to the treason of Weyoun 7 and the near incompetence of Weyoun 8 is wild (the look on his face when the Female Changeling said she would terminate him if the cloning facility were still available was brilliant - sorry, can't remember which episode that was).

Like Extreme measures, The dogs of war is a wrap up of character's lives before the action-intensive episode that is coming, but it does so in a much more coherent manner. Well worth watching.

Security censorship classification

PG (Low level violence)

Not for public release in Australia before date

VHS rental and retail: 2 December 1999

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